What's Up with Bill Siemering
Jun
24
5:00 pm17:00

What's Up with Bill Siemering

Our most recent pop up featured radio pioneer Bill Siemering, founder of Developing Radio Partners. Thanks to our colleagues at On Being for hosting the event in their beautiful studios at On Being on Loring Park.

A founding member of the NPR Board and author of the network’s original mission and goals, Bill led the development of All Things Considered as NPR’s first Director of Programming. While serving as Vice President and Radio Station Manager of WHYY Inc. in Philadelphia, Bill helped develop Fresh Air with Terry Gross.

Bill began his international work in 1993 by assisting community radio stations in South Africa’s townships as a 1993 recipient of a five-year MacArthur Foundation Fellowship. He returned to South Africa in 1995 as a Knight International Journalism Fellow. From 1996-97, he served as president of the Washington, D.C.-based International Center for Journalists, a leading print and broadcast journalism training program. Later he formed Developing Radio Partners, a nonprofit that works with community radio stations, mainly in Africa, to develop their capacity for fact-based information programming on the most important topics in development - population, health, agriculture, climate.

Talk about Like, Link, Share
Jan
8
Jan 30

Talk about Like, Link, Share

On January 8th at 8:00 AM I'll be presenting research findings from Like, Learn, Share: How cultural institutions are embracing digital technology. The event was not advertised publicly but there are a few seats available. Email me if you would like to participate. Sarah@LutmanAssociates.com

Up Next!
Oct
25
Dec 31

Up Next!

Watch this space for an announcement of our next Pop Up, in 2015!

Coworking guru Alex Hillman visits Minneapolis for the first time
Oct
23
6:30 pm18:30

Coworking guru Alex Hillman visits Minneapolis for the first time

  • Villa Rosa Room, Minneapolis Institute of Arts

Here's a cause for celebration!

Join us for a very special evening with Alex Hillman and talk about coworking and community building. This “gotta be there” event is Hillman’s first-ever visit to Minnesota. He's coming as part of a collaboration between OTA Conversations and What's Up Pop Up, and convened at Hothouse @ArtsMIA, a coworking pilot project taking place at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts. He'll be speaking about "Indy Hall 8 Years In: How one of America's leading coworking spaces can demonstrate its success."

Indy Hall’s ambition is to make Philadelphia (and the world) a better place for people to do what they love and to live the good life. Indy Hall founders believe in “the good life” in the Greek sense of the term, and they’re living it through Indy Hall. What is the good life?  It’s one that’s…..rich with relationships, ideas, emotion, health and vigor, recognition and contribution, passion and fulfillment, and great accomplishment and enduring achievement."

Indy Hall has been working to find the best ways to show the impact the space has had on people, on small business development, and on economic development and the creative economy of Philadelphia.  Hear Alex talk about the place, the work, and the stories, data, and video interviews that document its impact on individuals and communities.

Hillman, author of the popular blog Dangerously Awesome, has this to say about himself:

Alex Hillman had trouble writing this bio. Most bios are just trivial accolades and accomplishments...and how useful is that to you? Alex wanted to convey something else in this brief bit of text, which is basically: He would probably like you if he got to know you.  You should know that Alex believes in these 3 truths:  - True communities & great collaborations start with the foundation of trusting and meaningful relationships.  - Learning is a part of everyday life, and we learn best from each other. - Do, or do not. There is no try. JFDI.  If you *still* really want to glance at Alex's credentials, though, he is best known for co-founding Indy Hall in Philadelphia, one of the first and oldest coworking communities in the world. He's shared details about Indy Hall's techniques and approach to building authentic communities, through often radical transparency and real world stories. This has attracted business and community leaders around the world to learn from his experiences.  He tweets as @alexhillman, and writes at dangerouslyawesome.com, but the BEST way to find out more about Alex (including his clients, projects, and collaborations) is to start by introducing yourself.

Free, but please register HERE.

 

Creativity, aging, and the economy, What's Up with Chris Farrell?
Oct
3
10:30 am10:30

Creativity, aging, and the economy, What's Up with Chris Farrell?

  • Minneapolis Institute of Arts

Do you associate gray hair with creativity? The assumption that aging is an anathema to creativity is a widely held but false stereotype. It’s an attitude that may be the economy’s biggest creativity killer.

Let's gather for a myth-bashing discussion at the MIA in the same galleries that hold several works by Matisse. Henri Matisse was an artist who did some of his best work in his 80s, using innovations built on the skills he nurtured over a lifetime.

Free, but please register here.

Sing the Museum! A special pop up with Tesfa Wondemagegnehu
Sep
27
3:00 pm15:00

Sing the Museum! A special pop up with Tesfa Wondemagegnehu

Spend your Saturday afternoon exploring artworks at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts and singing along with them. For this event, we'll walk around the MIA (wear comfy shoes!), and visit five (or so) works of art. A docent will tell us a bit about each work, and then Tesfa will lead us in a song that relates to it. Fun! Ever wanted to sing your heart out in the resonant galleries of an art museum or learn about ways music and visual art are connected? Here's your chance.

Meet in the museum lobby off the 3rd Avenue entrance starting at 3:00 PM. Our tour and songfest begins at 3:30 and will last a bit less than an hour. Following, you can enjoy a beverage with Tesfa from the great Dogwood Coffee Bar in the MIA Lobby (beverages available for purchase). The MIA closes at 5:00 PM. Hope you can be there!

The event is free but registration is required. Here's the Eventbrite link.

Feb
25
4:00 pm16:00

What's Up with Ann Markusen

The Audience is Changing, so what are you going to do about it?


In a soon-to-be published paper presented for the Coloquio Internacional in Lisboa, Portugal, Ann and her co-author Alan Brown detail the shifting landscape of engagement as the public moves from "audience" to "participant." 

Faced with excess capacity, changing demographics, and new technology, traditional theatre owners, live performance companies, performing artists and musicians are struggling to find and maintain audiences. Conventional ways of doing so—marketing, outreach, incentives— are failing.

Why? Narrow programming is one culprit, as is the fact that contemporary audiences care as much about the setting as the performance itself. Finally, participants are seeking greater engagement in the act of artistic creation, including co-curation, which is a very challenging idea for some arts organizations. How should they respond? 

Nov
12
4:00 pm16:00

What's Up with Patrick Riley

You, Your Career, and Big Data


It’s 2013, and the world is waking up to the concept of “Big Data.”  There are volumes of information being collected about what we like, where we are, and who we're talking to.  We’re asking ourselves: what does this mean for us personally and professionally?  What does this mean for our organizations?  Is this the beginning of an Orwellian privacy nightmare or is this the start of a new transparency paradigm where everybody wins? 

Modern Survey co-founder and CEO Patrick Riley will share what Big Data is, where it came from, and what it means for your life and your career in the years ahead. Learn how employers think about Big Data and how to develop and manage your ‘personal brand’ as we accelerate into the information age. 

Oct
28
4:00 pm16:00

What's Up with Ronnie Brooks

The High Price of Work and Who’s Paying It?

Brooks-0755.jpg

In many and perhaps most cases, people in the arts, advocacy and social service are modestly paid (often without benefits) and subsidize the work of their organizations with their labor. Both by their behavior (giving long hours to the work and fewer to the cultivation of life outside of work) and by the allocation of resources (focusing on program and giving short shrift to savings), many at midlife find themselves stuck in a difficult place. Although the benefits of a life anchored in a noble purpose are huge, more and more people are unable to move through their careers, change their pace, and age in a way that is both satisfying and sustainable for them and beneficial to our communities.

The implications of the changing economy and the apparent revision of our social contract are huge.  Together, however, we could adjust the price of good work and better share its costs and benefits. 

Sep
23
4:00 pm16:00

What's Up with Chris Farrell

Creating a Career to Match Life’s Ages and Stages

Boomers are leaving behind the traditional image of retirement, the last third of life defined by saying goodbye to the workplace forever. We’re moving into a post-retirement era, less a model of disengagement from work and neighborhood to one of engagement in work and community. The returns on working longer are financial and emotional. Work represents both an income and a social environment. The logic of boomer engagement in the workplace is so powerful that it is likely to sweep aside many legal barriers and corporate practices that conspire to keep older workers from achieving their full potential.

The boomer realization that we’re working longer will also profoundly shape how younger generations think about their careers and their jobs. They’ll learn from boomers that they have time to experiment, to try different careers, to alternate the rhythm of their lives, sometimes pushing themselves deep into their careers and at other times exploring other meaningful opportunities.

Jul
8
4:00 pm16:00

What’s Up with Jon Hallberg and Hippocrates Café?

A Baseball Prescription: A tonic in nine innings


You may never have heard of Hippocrates Cafe, because most of the live show's 15 original programs are presented for private audiences, at medical meetings and symposia, or as fund-raisers for nonprofit organizations. Exploring topics like memory loss, coping with cancer, and serving the under-served, Hippocrates Cafe illuminates health care through story and song, performed by leading Twin Cities' actors and musicians, and hosted by Dr. Jon Hallberg, the Cafe's creator.

On July 8th Hippocrates Cafe is coming to the Republic Seven Corners for a rare public performance. Hallberg, who is among the Twins' cohort of team physicians, will offer his unusual take on healthcare and baseball, in an entertaining, informative, wistful look at how baseball relates to our minds, bodies, and spirits. Dr. Hallberg will be joined by performers Mark Nelson, Kris Nelson, T. Michael Rambo, Dan Newton, and Robert Bell.

Renaissance man Jon Hallberg is not just a physician and Associate Professor at the U of M. He is the medical director of the innovative and award-winning Minnesota Physicians' Mill City Clinic; a regular commentator on MPR's All Things Considered with Tom Crann, and manages the Fisch Art of Medicine Student Awards Program which allows medical students to explore the arts in ways that are not possible in the regular medical school curriculum. 

Jun
17
4:00 pm16:00

What's Up with Doug McLennan

New Ideas and New Forms in Cultural Media


Doug McLennan, founder and editor of Artsjournal.com, is a writer, editor, and producer of media focused on culture and increasingly on technology. As media has changed, so have Doug's activities. You might find him teaching at the Annenberg/Getty School of Journalism at USC, creating a MOOC for the Ojai Festival, or building a pop-up newsroom for the Humana Festival.

Doug will talk about some new approaches to cultural media projects in other cities. Then Dena AlspachKaywin Feldman, and Laura Zabel will respond with thoughts about how their organizations are approaching media and why.

Apr
27
4:00 pm16:00

What's Up with Stanford Thompson

The inaugural What’s Up Pop Up


KMP_6982-199x300.jpg

Stanford Thompson is the dynamic founder of Play On Philly! an El-Sistema-inspired program serving hundreds of children from Philadelphia's low income communities who study music every day after school. A 2009 graduate of the esteemed Curtis Institute of Music, Stanford was inspired by his experience as an Abreu Fellow, when he spent several months in Venezuela learning about that country's government-sponsored music program that involves some.200,000  children and has led to the development of one of the world's great orchestras, the Simon Bolivar Orchestra.

Bringing that vision home, Stanford founded Play On Philly and has become one of our nation's most articulate and passionate advocates for using music to intervene in the lives of low-income children. Hear about his experiences at Play On Philly and his vision for classical music's future.